How a MIT drop-out opened his own school and is successful (8 Photos)

Jeremy Rossman was sick of his growing student loan debt, especially since he went to MIT. There, undergraduate and living expenses for 9 months is $44,720.

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Instead of just letting the higher-education system keep him down, he decided to do something about it. He dropped out of MIT and re-invented the whole damn thing, which he calls the anti-college.

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With co-founder Ashu Desai, they created The Make School, a college replacement program for founders and developers, in San Francisco, California.

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The school gives students the option to not pay tuition upfront, making them debt-free. The model only charges students once they find employment after graduation. So, if you find yourself unemployed after being a student at The Make School, they suffer right along with you.

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The school gives students the option to not pay tuition upfront, making them debt-free. The model only charges students once they find employment after graduation. So, if you find yourself unemployed after being a student at The Make School, they suffer right along with you.

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In September, The Make School started their first year with almost 30 full-time students, with many who left traditional universities to take a swing at the alternative learning environment. They all live together in dorm-style housing. Since they’re in San Fran, they have access to top tech companies in Silicon Valley.

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Besides programming, Rossman also offers classes focused on everyday life, such as nutrition, health, exercise and writing. “And then some more generic life skills, communication, empathy, understanding the history of tech and then a big segment on ethics,” Rossman adds. “So Uber, what do we think? Airbnb, where do we stand? Is it okay to start a company in that way? Is it beneficial for society? Are the laws out of date? How does this all work behind the scenes?”

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Obviously, not everyone has welcomed this progressive way of learning with open arms. Rossmann has a rebuttal for them: “When LinkedIn and Lyft and these companies with tens of millions of dollars of funding are all committing contractually to coming and recruit here, and they don’t come to the school where your child is studying, that means something.”

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What do you think? Would you enroll? Or do you think this idea should remain in the fictional world along with the South Harmon Institute of Technology?

Learn more about The Make School HERE.

via – thechive

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